Oct. 29th, 2006 @ 10:38 pm stoat's first sock
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i got frustrated with the scarf i've been making for my mom, because i thought i would only need one skein to get it to a decent length, and i was wrong. it's a good 2 inches shorter than my first scarf, which is really about at the shortest length that a useful scarf can be, in my opinion. so i ran out and got another skein (yes, in the same lot -- this is where it's really good to be using Lion's Brand yarn - i suspect they have humongous lot sizes), and will deal with adding it in tomorrow.

instead of tackling it right away, i made a sock!



ain't it cute? it's kinda tiny:



and tiny is good, because i actually managed to finish it in about 7 hours (yes, i knit that slowly). it gives one a nice feeling of accomplishment, even if i'm not sure it would even fit on a baby!

I used the training sock pattern at knitty.com with my ever reliable Red Heart blue yarn and my new double-pointed size 8 needles. it wasn't too complicated -- i had to refer back to my book to remind myself what some of the abbreviations meant, but it was all doable. the only thing i changed was the finishing of the toe. The pattern says to "finish by pulling yarn through remaining stitches." instead, i did what the Stitch N' Bitch book suggests -- a kitchener stitch. looks like i should have turned the sock inside out before doing it, since the seam that is usually on the inside of a sock's toe ended up on the outside. ah well, that much i can remember for next time. :)

the one other thing i think i may have done wrong can be seen (fuzzily) here:



there's a gap on the side of the heel (both sides actually). i suspect i did something wrong when picking up stitches in the "Shape the Gusset" section of the instructions. not really sure what i should have done differently, tho i will admit i was sorta winging it at that point -- the loops they refer to had been incredibly obvious just a few minutes before, but as soon as i needed to use them, it was like they were camoflaged. i'll have to pay more attention the next time i try a sock. which will be soon after i finish that darn scarf!
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knitting
From:(Anonymous)
Date:October 30th, 2006 04:44 am (UTC)
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I forgot to sign my name to my congrats on your scarf, so I'll do that first here. This is your knitting pusher, Chawne. Hi!! And congrats, again, on the pretty scarf.

I'm quite impressed by your first sock! It looks really great and it will fit a kid for a little while. Anyway, you should see the carnage that occurred the first time I tried a sock. With the knowledge gained my making every sock mistake ever, I'll try to answer your two questions.

Kitchener stitch is done on the outside and there is no seam. It is a way to seal up stockinette and leave it so that it looks like you just continuously knit stockinette without any gap ever. It should be totally smooth, with no seam. It's likely that you just did it from L to R when it should have gone R to L; like maybe it needed to be flipped over somehow. Or maybe you skipped a beat the knit, purl, then purl, knit rhythm.

I always pick up two extra stitches at each of those corners on the gusset and then just do an extra decrease round knitting those together immediately on the first time around after picking up. It seals up that hole nicely. It's one of those fixes you'll throw into any sock pattern once you get going.



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From:megastoat
Date:October 31st, 2006 05:37 pm (UTC)
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i will have to look at my sock and at the Stitch N' Bitch book again. i seem to remember it saying something about the "right sides" should be facing each other -- i took that to mean the "outside" of the sock ought to be facing each other, and i didn't bother doing that, and thus wasn't worried that the toe seemed bumpier than i would have wanted. but maybe i did just skip a beat -- that's very possible. i will have to play with this.

and your idea for putting in extra stitches at the gusset is one i will definitely try to remember -- you're so handy! thank you!
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From:journeywoman
Date:October 30th, 2006 08:58 pm (UTC)
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Nice job! I agree with both of the PP's suggestions, though I don't usually have hole problems when I pick up stitches.

To avoid the need for a gusset entirely, you may be interested in trying short-row heels. I haven't made any real socks with short-row heels, just Xmas stocking, but I'm thinking that's what I'll use for my next pair. They're supposed to fit really well. (To date, I usually use the half-handkerchief heel for socks.)
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From:megastoat
Date:October 31st, 2006 05:40 pm (UTC)
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so many options for heels! i will try not to be overwhelmed with all there is to learn! ;-)
From:(Anonymous)
Date:October 31st, 2006 02:53 am (UTC)
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wow! no longer a grafting virgin. I hate grafting. I avoid it like the plague. Great job on the sock and the grafting.

I suggest making FuzzyFeet from knitty next. You felt them and cover up all the mistakes and gaping holes. I'm making a pair right now!

Laura
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From:megastoat
Date:October 31st, 2006 05:34 pm (UTC)
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hey, that's actually what i'm going to make next! well, after i finish the dang cabled scarf. can't let myself go onto something new until the xmas present is finished, or else my mom will be getting a scarf with the knitting needles still attached.

this whole felting thing intrigues me. i look forward to learning the mysteries. and commandeering the washing machine for something other than laundry. :)